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Central Iowa Roof Cleaning

Cedar Shakes Roof Cleaning Training Video

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Here is a video I did for Neil Krans from St. Louis, Mo. His business is www.showmecleanroofs.com. Neil is one of the roof cleaners I have trained to clean cedar shakes roofs by www.cedarroofclean.com and www.sullivanroofcleaning.com. As part of the training we product a video for his web site, along with the before and after pictures of the jobs Neil did during his training.

 

http://youtu.be/RvyWzYPP0FM

 

As to the training. Each trainee has to come to Iowa. We review all the equipment. We review all types of solution/mix needed for each different type of infestations. They have to clean a min. of 5 cedar shakes roofs. Each roof has a majority of a different type of infestation i.e. algae, moss, mold, mildew, lichen and white & brown rot fungi. This way they have experience removing each type of infestation. They get the experience of how to apply the cleaning solution, how long to let the solution dwell for each infestation and how to rinse with garden hose pressure. Again, we take alot of video of the trainee cleaning a cedar shakes roofs and then edit a video for their web site. We also have before & after pictures of the jobs they cleaned to be used on their web site.  I also provide them with marketing for cedar shakes. Once the training is complete there is no question they can go back to their location and add cedar shakes roof cleaning to their service.

 

This training only applies to cedar shakes. The purpose of the training is to build a network of cedar shakes roof cleaners throughout the country.

 

Because of the time involved, and requests booked, I am not taking any more trainees at this time. This post is for informational purpose only.

 

For those wanting to learn the trade of roof cleaning, as I did, they need to learn the trade from RCIA.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Good video Bruce. Thats a nice service to provide training for cedar roof cleaning. Do you ever seal the roofs also?

 

Thanks. Videos are the best for SEO.

 

Cedar should never be sealed. They need to breathe, contract and expand with the weather conditions i.e. rain, snow, moisture. That is why they are spaced.

The best thing you can do for cedar is to make sure you use a water based oil in your cleaning mix. It serves two purposes, one it will replenish the natural oils that leach out over time and help add to the curb appeal.

 

There are those that stain cedar, though the school is still out on the benefits other than adding some curb appeal. Staining is expensive, laborous and has limited lasting effect because most of the stains don't weather well. Some stains can do more harm because they work like a sealer i.e. the oil based. I am no expert on staining but those I have spoken with that do stain are now getting away from it.

 

I have found that just a good cleaning with the right solution mix will go along way to perserving cedar. It is not that laborous and very cost effect to the homoeowner.

 

Here are some facts if interested:

 

Cedar is a natural insulator against the environment; competitors can’t come close to the thermal efficiency of wood. In fact, cedar has twice the thermal resistivity (R-value) of asphalt, 5 times that of slate, 8 times that of concrete, and hundreds of times that of metal and aluminum.

 

Cedar roofs don’t decay, but they do weather. It has natural preservatives that resist moisture, decay and insect damage. Although in warm, humid climates and on heavily shaded roofs, algae, moss, mold, mildew, lichen and fungi’s will grow, because these organisms retain moisture the cedar will decay in time if not maintained.

 

When new the shakes and shingles display the natural honey and cinnamon tones, and will later mature to a seasoned and distinguished-looking silvery gray when properly maintained.

 

If the shakes or shingles display a brown/dark brown to black tones, these are signs of harmful organism infestations and they need to be cleaned.

 

With a proper cedar roof maintenance program a cedar roof will last anywhere from 40 to 60 years.

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Wow, That's a long time for a cedar roof to last, 40 years!

I cleaned a cedar roof last September that was 47 years old, they had it cleaned twice before. Back in Maine were I am from there are homes with cedar roofs over 60 years old, but they have been maintained. Remember cedar will not decay, it is the infestations that decay them i.e. moss, white & brown rot fungi, etc. Back in the old days cedar roofs didn't have underling/felt. They were lat with cedar shakes and could breathe real well and thus last a long time. Today everything is decking, 30# felt under cedar shakes. Most don't install right because there is suppose to be spacers between the felt and shakes for air. The felt is the water barrier and the shakes protect the felt. UV damage is the number one cause of deterioration to felt.

 

But you know all that. ;)

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Guest A to Z Roof Cleaning   
Guest A to Z Roof Cleaning

Proper installation nowadays requires a product called cedar breather. It is what provides air flow under the shingles. It is typical and required for proper installation. It also costs a small fortune! I have installed many cedar roofs, maybe one day I'll get a call to clean one of them!

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Your right Zack. Many don't understand proper installation. Without the spacers they won't breathe properly.

 

Last year we cleaned 116 of them. Given the number we have booked already this year we will top that number this year.

 

Up in Maine where I am from alot of the old homes have cedar, which back in the day was installed over latting which is spaced, and they still have the same roof. Some are over 80 years old.

 

Chris in one of his replies to this post said 40 years sounds like a long time and can be if not installed properly, but if installed properly and maintained they'll out live all of us. LOL

 

Having installed cedar roofs you know the key is the felt, the felt protects the roof and the shakes protects the felt.

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Your right Zack. Many don't understand proper installation. Without the spacers they won't breathe properly.

 

Last year we cleaned 116 of them. Given the number we have booked already this year we will top that number this year.

 

Up in Maine where I am from alot of the old homes have cedar, which back in the day was installed over latting which is spaced, and they still have the same roof. Some are over 80 years old.

 

Chris in one of his replies to this post said 40 years sounds like a long time and can be if not installed properly, but if installed properly and maintained they'll out live all of us. LOL

 

Having installed cedar roofs you know the key is the felt, the felt protects the roof and the shakes protects the felt.

 

Bruce, off topic a bit, but have your ever considered getting into Oiling Cedar Roofs ?

I had a friend who really made them beautiful by applying Chevron Oil, specially made to beautify and protect Cedar Shake Roofs!

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Bruce, off topic a bit, but have your ever considered getting into Oiling Cedar Roofs ?

I had a friend who really made them beautiful by applying Chevron Oil, specially made to beautify and protect Cedar Shake Roofs!

Yes I have and I looked into it, the Chevron Oil. May well add that in the near future. Right now money is tight and people just don't want to replace their roof and the cedar cleaning has taken off. Good heads up Chris.

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Yes I have and I looked into it, the Chevron Oil. May well add that in the near future. Right now money is tight and people just don't want to replace their roof and the cedar cleaning has taken off. Good heads up Chris.

I was thinking of you the other day Bruce! It is not often we get a chance to get Beef and Pork from Iowa!

It is a real "treat" when we do!

We stumbled into a store selling it last week, and Man, I FORGOT what good meat was supposed to taste like!

As I was finishing my Steak, I told everyone at the table I have a good friend in Iowa, who eats great, every night!

 

Neither of us is getting any younger Bruce, I hope you eat good brother!

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I am getting ready to do a cedar roof and they want it oiled that's what we are using chevron oil.

That's awesome Eric! There is good money to be made with the Chevron Oil, especially for a true painting professional like you!

I just love watching you clean roofs brother. You are one of the FEW (besides Bruce, and some others) that don't make me "nervous" when they start spraying.

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I was thinking of you the other day Bruce! It is not often we get a chance to get Beef and Pork from Iowa!

It is a real "treat" when we do!

We stumbled into a store selling it last week, and Man, I FORGOT what good meat was supposed to taste like!

As I was finishing my Steak, I told everyone at the table I have a good friend in Iowa, who eats great, every night!

 

Neither of us is getting any younger Bruce, I hope you eat good brother!

Oh yeah. Go to Fareway and buy my meat fresh. The weather has been bad here so not much barby action. LOL

Where is the spell checker on this site. LOL

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I am getting ready to do a cedar roof and they want it oiled that's what we are using chevron oil.

Remember cedar only has a 3% natural oil content. They will only hydrate so much. You'll want to put it on thin layers and let it dwell. If your using SH make sure you get all the film off from the SH. I don't use SH so I don't have the issue, I have gone to a powered citrus base for my cedar mix.

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So whats the best way to tackle these cedar shakes. I know I should pre wet the wood so that the cleaners stay on top and kill whats on the surface. But should I be using sodium per carbonate or skip that and just use a citric acid or oxalic acid. Any thoughts people??

Here in Tampa, where I live, I can nearly count on both hands, how many Cedar Roofs I have cleaned in over 20 years in the roof cleaning business. I have always simply treated them just like a shingle roof, and was always careful to do a test spot for the customer first, to be sure he was OK with the color change. My good friend Bruce Sullivan has developed a different process that is said to be a better way to clean a cedar roof. He sells this information, and gives you a protected territory. He owns Sullivan Roof Cleaning up in Iowa.  

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