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Besides sodium hypochlorite, there are some other roof cleaning chemicals I have wanted to play with more. I have employees on commission who work for me and clean roofs. They resent it when I take their trucks to experiment! 

 

But 2 possible roof cleaning chemicals are Calcium Hypochlorite and Lithium Hypochlorite.

Calcium Hypochlorite has been tried, and it has the problem of leaving a scale behind that is hard to remove.

It is also not very water soluble. But Lithium Hypochlorite is very water soluble, and will not leave a residue I was told. 

I have always planned to play with it, just never did. SH is cheap here in Tampa, and we are a busy roof cleaning company. 

 

Hydrogen Peroxide is another chemical that I once thought would clean roofs. However, Hydrogen Peroxide strong enough to clean with is also a BOMB, and can blow up.

 

It also smells terrible! 

 

Anyone interested in this subject of alternative roof cleaning chemicals ?

 

 

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All possibilities are of interest!

At my age, I suspect I will stick with SH, but who knows?

I thought I was set with Ammonyx Lo, until you posted Gain-now, I am using a mix of the 2 and would not care to be without Gain! Much cheaper and has smell, unlike Ammonyx= more expensive and no smell!

Anything you think up [Chris] is worth thinking about, to me!!!

Waiting to hear the test results, good or bad!

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All possibilities are of interest!

At my age, I suspect I will stick with SH, but who knows?

I thought I was set with Ammonyx Lo, until you posted Gain-now, I am using a mix of the 2 and would not care to be without Gain! Much cheaper and has smell, unlike Ammonyx= more expensive and no smell!

Anything you think up [Chris] is worth thinking about, to me!!!

Waiting to hear the test results, good or bad!

Thanks Brother! 

 

Let's look at Calcium Hypochlorite for a second ? If you use it strong enough to clean roofs with using non pressure, it always leaves a nasty film (Scale) behind. I have 2 ideas on how to combat this.

 

One is to use a scale inhibitor in it, and the other is to raise the PH of it, until the Hypochlorite ION becomes dominate, like it does in SH.

 

Here is a list of some possible alternative roof cleaning chemicals.

Please pay attention to the PH of all of them ?

 

 

Oxidizers (Shock)
 
Cal-hypo or Calcium Hypochlorite is one of the more popular oxidizers or shocks used in in-ground non-vinyl pools.  The “hypochlorite” means it is unstabalized chlorine.  Calcium is the vehicle for broadcasting the chlorine.  It has a very high pH of 10.4 to 10.8.  Calcium Hypochlorite should be avoided in areas with hard water, which is high in calcium content, and where the pH levels tend to be naturally high.  16 oz treats 16,500 gallons of pool water.   Brand Names: Leslie's Power Powder Plus, Suncoast Super Shock.
 
Lithium Hypochlorite is a more recent product designed primarily for use in portable spas and can also be used in vinyl lined pools.  The “hypochlorite” means it is unstabalized chlorine.  Lithium is one of the softest forms of metal and is part of the alkali family of metals.  Lithium Hypochlorite is therefore sometimes referred to as Alkali Hypochlorite.  It has a very high pH of 9.9 to 10.7.  Lithium Hypochlorite should be avoided in areas with high total alkalinity and where the pH levels tend to be naturally high.  Lithium Hypochlorite also can be a very dangerous substance that can cause severe burns if contacted with the skin and should be used with extreme caution.  16 oz treats 4,000 gallons of pool water.  Brand Name: Spa Time Shock Treatment.
 
Dichlor or Sodium Dichloro-s-triazinethrione is a popular oxidizer or shock for use in vinyl pools and portable spas.  The “-s-triazinethrione” refers to the addition of cynauric acid (CYA) stabilizer.  Sodium was added as a vehicle for diluting and broadcasting the chlorine so as to avoid direct contact between undiluted chlorine and plastic or vinyl linings.  It contains a near neutral pH of  5.8 to 7.0.  Dichlor should be avoided when the cynauric acid (CYA) stabilizer levels in the pool approach 100ppm.  It is fast dissolving, allowing swimming 15 minutes after application.  16 oz treats 12,000 gallons of pool water.  Brand Names: Aqua Chem Vinyl Pool Shock or Shock Plus (which is actually a "4-in-1" oxidizer/clarifier/buffer/flocculent), Leslie's Chlor Brite, Suncoast Shock for Vinyl Pools.
 
Trichlor or Trichloro-s-triazonethrione is the same thing chemically as the stabilized chlorine tablets except in granular form.  The “-s-triazinethrione” refers to the addition of cynauric acid (CYA) stabilizer.  It is specifically designed for in-ground non-vinyl pools.  It contains a near neutral pH of  4.8 to 5.8.  Trichlor should be avoided when the cynauric acid (CYA) stabilizer levels in the pool approach 100ppm.  It is fast dissolving, allowing swimming 15 minutes after application.  10 oz treats 12,000 gallons of pool water.  Brand Name: Leslie's Genesis Shock.
 
Non-Chlorine Shock or Potassium Peroxy Monopersulfate has the advantage of not superchlorinating the pool while still eliminating the organic contaminates and decomposing the dead algae and debris.  It can be used in all pools.  It has a very low pH of 2.0 to 2.3.  Because it contains no calcium, alkali or cynauric acid (CYA) stabilizer, it can be used in almost any swimming pool environment without causing water quality problems.  It is fast dissolving, allowing swimming 15 minutes after application.  16 oz treats 10,000 gallons of pool water.  Brand Names:  Leslie's Fresh 'N Clear, Spa Time Non-Chlorine Oxidizer, Suncoast Shock & Swim.

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Non-Chlorine Shock or Potassium Peroxy Monopersulfate has the advantage of not superchlorinating the pool while still eliminating the organic contaminates and decomposing the dead algae and debris. It can be used in all pools. It has a very low pH of 2.0 to 2.3. Because it contains no calcium, alkali or cynauric acid (CYA) stabilizer, it can be used in almost any swimming pool environment without causing water quality problems. It is fast dissolving, allowing swimming 15 minutes after application. 16 oz treats 10,000 gallons of pool water. Brand Names: Leslie's Fresh 'N Clear, Spa Time Non-Chlorine Oxidizer, Suncoast Shock & Swim.

We always use this in our mix. When its cold out it help clean faster.

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Non-Chlorine Shock or Potassium Peroxy Monopersulfate has the advantage of not superchlorinating the pool while still eliminating the organic contaminates and decomposing the dead algae and debris. It can be used in all pools. It has a very low pH of 2.0 to 2.3. Because it contains no calcium, alkali or cynauric acid (CYA) stabilizer, it can be used in almost any swimming pool environment without causing water quality problems. It is fast dissolving, allowing swimming 15 minutes after application. 16 oz treats 10,000 gallons of pool water. Brand Names: Leslie's Fresh 'N Clear, Spa Time Non-Chlorine Oxidizer, Suncoast Shock & Swim.

We always use this in our mix. When its cold out it help clean faster.

 

Do you think it works Eric ? Seriously, have you ever tried it with, and with out it ? 

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Non-Chlorine Shock or Potassium Peroxy Monopersulfate has the advantage of not superchlorinating the pool while still eliminating the organic contaminates and decomposing the dead algae and debris. It can be used in all pools. It has a very low pH of 2.0 to 2.3. Because it contains no calcium, alkali or cynauric acid (CYA) stabilizer, it can be used in almost any swimming pool environment without causing water quality problems. It is fast dissolving, allowing swimming 15 minutes after application. 16 oz treats 10,000 gallons of pool water. Brand Names: Leslie's Fresh 'N Clear, Spa Time Non-Chlorine Oxidizer, Suncoast Shock & Swim.

We always use this in our mix. When its cold out it help clean faster.

 

OK, check out this video ? This guy really knows his shit! I posted a question "What can we add to bleaqch to increase the formation and activity of the Hypchlorite Ion"

Go to the YouTube page of this video Eric, and ASK this chemist if Potassium PermagnateMonopersulfate really works, or not ?

 

Please, post that question there, OK ?

 

http://youtu.be/B6g-F8s-9aQ

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Hmmmm, I watched the video. Was he speaking English? LOL I guess I'm too dumb to follow that!

On the other hand, I have tried Potassium PermagnateMonopersulfate twice now and the 2nd time using 2 pump up garden sprayers. I couldn't see any difference at all? I wonder if it perhaps would just jumpstart a weakened SH mix? Seems I heard that once?

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Do you think it works Eric ? Seriously, have you ever tried it with, and with out it ? 

I do think it boosts the mix.  I have done both with and with out and I think it cleans faster, especially in colder temps.

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I do think it boosts the mix.  I have done both with and with out and I think it cleans faster, especially in colder temps.

Eric I have also used it and it does boost the mix and speed up the cleaning time. But it also has a harsher smell and it is brutal on flowered plants. Need to cover and water plants like Rose of Sharons, Rose bushes and other flowering and potted plants.

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Hmmmm, I watched the video. Was he speaking English? LOL I guess I'm too dumb to follow that!

On the other hand, I have tried Potassium PermagnateMonopersulfate twice now and the 2nd time using 2 pump up garden sprayers. I couldn't see any difference at all? I wonder if it perhaps would just jumpstart a weakened SH mix? Seems I heard that once?

 

Me either!

 

But then it was not cold outside. In the SH, we want the Hypochlorite ION, not the Hypochlorus acid. We add acid to swimming pools to maximize the formation of the hypochlorus acid by lowering the PH. The Hypochlorus Acid is a disinfectant, not a cleaner! For cleaning with SH, we want the Hyperchlorite ION, and that only occurs at high PH.

 

Potassium Permagnate Monopersulfate has a PH between 2 and 3 !  Adding it to SH will drop, not raise the PH. 

In theory, it can help the SH become a better disinfectant, because it lowers the PH. 

 

Perhaps there is something else going on, and that is why I asked Eric to ask that Chemist.

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A chemist suggested adding 1to 2% of caustic soda to the mix ( talking about slate). He said that it is a cleaning agent in itself but great care was required with some metals

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Hmmmm, I watched the video. Was he speaking English? LOL I guess I'm too dumb to follow that!

On the other hand, I have tried Potassium PermagnateMonopersulfate twice now and the 2nd time using 2 pump up garden sprayers. I couldn't see any difference at all? I wonder if it perhaps would just jumpstart a weakened SH mix? Seems I heard that once?

lol...we got lost on his speach as well!!

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We currently use a sodium hypochlorite solution for our non-pressure roof cleaning on tile roofs. Depending on the sun, I use between a  (water) 60:40 (SH) to a (water) 50/50 (SH) mix. First, am I correct in this formula?  Secondly, has anyone that uses this formula ever had a problem with fading someone's exterior paint?!

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Do you think it works Eric ? Seriously, have you ever tried it with, and with out it ? 

I found this on the cdc.gov website...."Sodium hypochlorite is highly reactive and volatile. At normal pH (6-8), sodium hypochlorite can degrade substantially within 2-3 weeks. This shelf life is not adequate for use in the SWS, which requires that the hypochlorite remain at a high enough concentration to inactivate disease-causing organisms. By raising the pH of the hypochlorite solution, you stabilize the solution. The pH can be raised by the addition of sodium hydroxide, which is widely available. In order to determine the amount of sodium hydroxide to add to your sodium hypochlorite solution, you will need to complete trial-and-error testing. Add a known volume of sodium hydroxide to a known volume of sodium hypochlorite, and then measure the pH with a meter or kit. Because source water quality is different in each location, there is not one standard volume of sodium hydroxide to add to ensure pH is above 11. You will have to start with a known volume (perhaps 1 tablespoon in 1 gallon, or 5 ml in 1 liter) and complete repeat trial-and-error testing. The exact pH is not important in this context—you simply need to ensure that the pH level is above 11."

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We currently use a sodium hypochlorite solution for our non-pressure roof cleaning on tile roofs. Depending on the sun, I use between a  (water) 60:40 (SH) to a (water) 50/50 (SH) mix. First, am I correct in this formula?  Secondly, has anyone that uses this formula ever had a problem with fading someone's exterior paint?!

 

Thats a little Hot for the mix, IMHO. And yes, the roof cleaning chemical can fade and change the color of paint!

I found this on the cdc.gov website...."Sodium hypochlorite is highly reactive and volatile. At normal pH (6-8), sodium hypochlorite can degrade substantially within 2-3 weeks. This shelf life is not adequate for use in the SWS, which requires that the hypochlorite remain at a high enough concentration to inactivate disease-causing organisms. By raising the pH of the hypochlorite solution, you stabilize the solution. The pH can be raised by the addition of sodium hydroxide, which is widely available. In order to determine the amount of sodium hydroxide to add to your sodium hypochlorite solution, you will need to complete trial-and-error testing. Add a known volume of sodium hydroxide to a known volume of sodium hypochlorite, and then measure the pH with a meter or kit. Because source water quality is different in each location, there is not one standard volume of sodium hydroxide to add to ensure pH is above 11. You will have to start with a known volume (perhaps 1 tablespoon in 1 gallon, or 5 ml in 1 liter) and complete repeat trial-and-error testing. The exact pH is not important in this context—you simply need to ensure that the pH level is above 11."

Yes, the higher the PH the better, for both cleaning and stability. 

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Thats a little Hot for the mix, IMHO. And yes, the roof cleaning chemical can fade and change the color of paint!

Yes, the higher the PH the better, for both cleaning and stability. 

If the SH is a 10% solution (we buy in liquid form from the pool store) to start with, and I add the water this brings it down to a 4%-5% SH dilution. So, are you saying that this (Hot) mix is not good? This is what I was taught and if I am doing it wrong, I want to know. I will take all the suggestions on what to use that is proper, and in what ratio to use them with. Oh, what is IMHO??

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Guest A to Z Roof Cleaning   
Guest A to Z Roof Cleaning

Imho is In my humble opinion

Rofl is rolling on the floor laughing

Gtfo is ge the f out

Roflmfao is rolling on the floor laughing my f-ing azz off

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Chris,

 

If I understand you correctly the higher the ph the better cleaning results , is that correct? Would that also allow for using less SH in the mix or am i on the wrong track.

Thanks 

Michael

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