Basic Roof Cleaning System, Tanks, Plumbing, etc. Layout Drawings and Pictures.


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Posted (edited)

This thread will be to show the most basic layout drawings for tanks, plumbing, etc. Normally this would go in the Members section...however, newbies need at least *some* basic knowledge and nothing here isn't available online with about 5 minutes of searching. 

HOWEVER...

If you are new...just join as a Premium member. Seriously, it is a heck of an investment. Ask most any Premium. The amount of knowledge and detailed information you will find on pumps, accessories, layouts, how to keep things running, chemicals, marketing and SEO...is absolutely 1000% worth it. Premium membership will save you money and it will make you money.  

Meantime, I will leave this thread open for drawings and system layout images. Please leave extensive discussions of different types of systems to different threads to keep this reasonably simple to navigate. If you have specific questions on a specific layout, please ask. 

 If anybody wants to contribute their own layout drawings or pictures, please do so. 

Oh...and ANYBODY who tries to start the Top Vs. Bottom Bulkhead argument will be strung up by their Petard and pelted mercilessly with rotted fruits and vegetables. 

***************

Here are some universal guidelines applicable to ALL pump setups: 

1) Suction line to the pump must be spiral reinforced or hard piped. It is under vacuum. This should be PVC. 

2) Suction Line Sizing:

     3/8 pump: 3/4"

     1/2" Pump. 1"

     1" Pumps. 1" Note: 1" Air diaphragm pumps run fine with 1" input lines as long as they are driven with reasonable CFM.

 3) Grey Schedule 80 PVC is the preferred material for hard pipes. Schedule 80 is thicker, stronger and more UV resistant. All PVC will eventually degrade from UV if not coated. 

4) All pumps should have at least a small section of flexible input and output lines going directly in and out of the pumps. This is especially true for Air Diaphragm and Udor types.  

5) All pumps with the exception of Kynar Air Diaphragm pumps with Teflon Diaphragms should be rinsed with fresh water after spraying.

6) Vented Chemical rated ball valves last longer.  

7) If you use Banjo valves, you must use the Teflon ball/Viton seal version. The Buna Rubber seal version will leak...rapidly. 

8) Trigger guns don't last. We all use Ball valves. See note on Schedule 80 or use a Poly Banjo valve at the spray hose end.  They won't break as easily if dropped. 

9) *Most* metal will rust in the presence of SH. Anything exposed to SH fumes or direct spray should be coated. 

10) Thread sealer containing Teflon is far preferable over Teflon tape for all fluid connections. Air Connections are fine with Teflon Tape. 

11. You need water hose on your truck. Buy Mean Green Hose. Don't argue, don't bargain shop, just buy it. Factorydirecthose.com

12. Check all fittings thoroughly on a regular basis. Test all new fittings with water under pressure with the pump spraying. 

 

Materials Guide. 

Materials from least to most resistant to Chlorine,

Pump Materials: Fiberglass Reinforced Polypropylene....Virgin Polypropylene...FKM/Viton...PVC...Teflon...PVDF/Kynar

Metals: Steel/Iron...Aluminum...Stainless Steel...Hastelloy C...Titanium. 

Spray Hose: Polybraid...Polyurethane...PVC Blend. 

 

Edited by PeakOfPerfection

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Posted


Dual%20tank_zpsii7amkmy.jpg

 

The most popular of all tank layouts. The twin tank setup is easy to install. It is applicable for any type of pump. Highly recommended for electric setups and their need to rinse. 

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Posted (edited)

SingleTank_zpsvfcf6e9u.jpg

Single Tank setup. Draw tube with small rinse bucket or tank. 

This is the most rudimentary of all the setups. A tank, a bucket, a draw tube and a pump (and a reel if desired). Does not get any more basic than this. 

Applicable for any kind of pump. Note: This design should NOT be used in an enclosed trailer or box truck as the fumes and drips will eventually destroy the interior. This is best for a trailer and you should rinse the trailer/truck bed/flat bed after every job as there will inevitably be drips from the drop tube. Consider a sealed/vented tank system instead...even with an open truck or trailer. 

Note: the supply line must be a spiral reinforced suction line. This line is under vacuum as the pump draws and you do not want to collapse it. Spray hose line should NOT be used here...only on the output from the pump. 

Edited by PeakOfPerfection

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Posted (edited)

drawtube_zps87wdtyts.jpg

Basic Dip Tube Design. Please note:  I DO NOT RECOMMEND THE USE OF A DIP TUBE SYSTEM. Using a dip tube into an open tank is a recipe for rotting out your trailer/truck/etc. The drips and the fumes will corrode everything out. A bulkhead fitting is a few dollars and takes all of 5 minutes to install. 

PLEASE NOTE: THIS SHOWS THE CHECK VALVE AS A FLAPPER TYPE. YOU MAY ALSO USE A BALL CHECK VALVE. 

ALSO NOTE: You CAN put a 90 degree elbow at the bottom and turn the strainer sideways. This has an advantage in that you will get a bit more fluid from the tank. However be careful if you use a bucket to rinse that you do not make it wider than the bucket diameter. 

Q: Can I use it without the check valve?

A: Yes, but you will end up fighting priming constantly. The check valve prevents the fluid from back flowing out of the line, providing prime for the pump. 

Q: Can I use the check valve at the END of the pipe, just before the filter?

A: Absolutely! Matter of fact, that is an even better design...I just didn't feel like re-drawing it again. 

Q: What kind of filter should I use? 

A: It can be as simple as a piece of PVC pipe with slots cut in it and a cap at the end. The only thing you do NOT want is metal mesh. Pressure Tek sells one that is dirt cheap. It is poly. It will work fine. 

 

Edited by PeakOfPerfection
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Posted (edited)

Tank%20Draw%20Types_zpscevfroai.jpg

These are the three types of tank draw systems. Dip tube, Top Bulkhead Draw and Bottom Bulkhead Draw. 

Of them, the Top and Bottom Bulkhead Draws are the ones you are most likely to find on an experienced roof cleaning rig. Dip tubes are a recipe for corrosion but some retailers continue to sell prepackaged electric pump systems with them so it is included here. 

Q: What type of bulkhead do I need?

A: Top draw can be Poly or PVC. Bottom Draw should be PVC with FKM gasket.

Q. Bottom Draw...what is the best valve? 

A. A chem rated, PVC Schedule 80 vented chem ball valve or Kynar Valve is best. They are not cheap, but worth it.  

Q: Which is the best type of draw...top or bottom?

A. Ooooh no. Oh hell no...you are NOT getting me into THAT argument. It has been beat to DEATH here. Pick one, be happy, go make money. 

 

WHAT is a Bulkhead? A Bulkhead is a fitting which is designed to go into a tank and allow for the passage of fluid through it and connection into fluid lines. Installing bulkheads into tanks requires you to be able to get the bulkhead nut into the tank, drilling the appropriate sized hole and tightening the fitting. Top tank bulkheads can be Poly. Bottom of the tank bulkheads should be Schedule 80 PVC with FKM (Viton) gaskets. 

Bulkhead-Fittings-Greenleaf-2_zpsmjhujaz

Edited by PeakOfPerfection
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Posted (edited)

Sealed%20Tank_zps8qtb1vsb.jpg

This sealed tank system is what is required to properly and safely use an SH storage/mix tank in an ENCLOSED trailer, box truck or van. To properly use this type of system, the tank must have either no manway opening or it must have a sealed and UNVENTED manway opening. 

NOTE: THIS TANK DESIGN CAN and SHOULD BE USED ON ANY spray rig. If you are using a truck bed, setting up an external fill port and venting the SH fumes down and away from the bed is a very good idea. On trailers, running gear is always at risk of corrosion. Running gear HAS failed due to this problem. Trailer frames HAVE broken. This system allows you to control where the fumes exit the tank and eliminates 

Q: Do I need a pump to pump the SH into the tank?

A: Yes. But you will require a pump regardless. Unless you are buying gallon bottles of store bought bleach, you will be getting your SH in Carboys, Drums, Totes or you will have a storage tank on site. So you'll need a pump. The SAFEST way of pumping the SH into the tank is by using an external fill port. This can be as simple as a pipe coming off the tank onto he side of the truck with a valve to stop uncontrolled fumes and a Camlock connector. Filling the tank with water is easy, just use a GHT to Camlock adapter on your hose and hook it up. If you draw from barrels, this means a pump with positive suction. If you fill from a storage tank via bottom bulkhead (aka IBC Tote, etc.) it means you can utilize a 120 Volt Pool Pump. Just plumb in a small flush tank to flush the pump and lines and it will last a good long time. 

Q: What kind of vent line do I need? 

A. Either PVC Pipe (Schedule 80 if exposed to UV light), PVC flex hose. Rubber vent hose will quickly break down. 

Q: What size vent line do I need?

A: At least 1/2". Smaller and you risk slowing your fills. If you use a rapid fill pump like a pool pump, then try to go 3/4 or 1" for the fill and vent lines. 

Q: What about Surfactant?

A: Get a small 3-5 gallon tank and mount it above the mix tank. Put an output line on it with a valve and then tee it into the fill line...or install another barb fitting and put it right into the tank. Then just open the valve and fill your tank with as much surfactant as you need. Alternatively, you can install a small surfactant pump and pump it into the tank as needed from either onboard or off board storage. As it is only surfactant, the pump need not be chem resistant. 

Edited by PeakOfPerfection
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Posted (edited)

Dual%20Vented%20Tank_zpslwlblygk.jpg

Dual Vented Tank System with Onboard SH Storage. 

Now, we are getting advanced but this is the system I use on my rigs, have set up for several clients and suggest to any roof cleaner who does a lot of volume and finds themselves requiring more feed stock fills but is limited in space. Although it may look complicated, it is actually very simple to implement. It is simply two tanks stacked on atop the other with the top storing pure 12.5% SH and the bottom being a mix tank. 

This setup requires vertical nesting square tanks. I use Tote A Lube tanks on my version. 

The major advantage to this type of setup is that it allows for massive onboard DOT Legal roof mix storage with tons of capacity in a limited space. As an example...a 120 mix tank with a 70 Gallon SH tank will give you the capability of legally leaving your shop with 300 gallons of roof mix, assuming you use 33% mixes (1/3 SH, 2/3 H2O) and you leave with 30 gallons of 12.5% SH in the bottom tank (which makes 90 gallons of roof mix) and 70 gallons of 12.5% in the top (which makes 210 Gallons of roof mix.  

For those contractors who do large multi unit residential or commercial...OR, for the guys who have no place to store their SH feed stock, this system allows you to do multiple roofs from a single fill.  

This system also has the advantage in that making up new batches is as easy as hooking up a fill water hose to the mix tank and turning the valve on the SH storage tank to gravity feed the amount of SH you need down into the mix tank. No pumps are necessary. 

The DISADVANTAGE to this type of system is that it is taller than a single tank system. There are many different tanks available which will work. The second drawback is that these tanks are a bit more money than leg tanks. However, one return to base saved to refill will rapidly make up the price difference. 

Edited by PeakOfPerfection
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Posted

Basic Air Diaphragm Pump Air System Layout. 

 

 

Air%20Diaphragm%20Air%20Layout_zpsmfji0d

This is a basic air diaphragm system air supply layout. 

Note: It assumes a compressor with a built in air regulator. If your compressor is larger and does not come with a regulator, a filter/regulator/guage combo should be inserted AFTER the Tsunami Water separator. 

This system assumes a basic air cooling system with a water tank in a standard dual tank spray system acting as the air cooler. In the most basic of systems with compressor under 10 CFM, a long coil of air hose...around 30-50 feet can sometimes be used. However, the cooler the air is that goes into the water separator, the more effective the separator is. For a more extensive discussion of the reasons and physics behind AODD pump cooling systems including alternative cooling system layouts as well as a discussion on Air Diaphragm system advantages for mobile cleaning  (hint...all three forum Admins use them) please see the sticky notes in the Members only section).  

This design is the most popular of all layouts. Please note: the tank must have water in it for this to work. I recommend 1/2" airline for lower line losses and more surface area for cooling.

I recommend the Tsunami 1/2" water separator and ONLY the Tsunami 1/2" water separator unless your compressor is over 30 CFM...then the 3/4" Tsunami should be used. We've tried every other separator and just buy the Tsunami. It is worth every penny. Period. 

Please also note that an air manifold is commonly used. The air manifold allows you to distribute the compressed air to other tools. It typically inserted after the regulator and water separator and consists of several additional valves and quick connects which allow you to hook up additional pieces of air driven equipment such as air reels with blowdown guns, air tools, tire inflators, etc. 

Note: The operation of this system is easy. Start the compressor, select the pressure...tyically 40 to 80 PSI, and turn the air valve on to the pump. Take the spray hose up and open the spray valve. It is that easy. 

 

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Posted (edited)

Basic Electric Pump Layout. 

electric%20pump%20diagram_zpszdiisdsd.jp

 

This is the recommended PROFESSIONAL layout for electric pump setups. Unlike just about any other electric pump diagram you may have seen, this layout includes an ACR which hooks to the positive terminal of the starter battery in the engine compartment. Now, I know there will be some who will question the need for an ACR (automatic charging relay). "We've never used it that way...harumph harrumph". But there is a very good reason behind this recommendation from somebody who ran electric for several years before switching to air and had exactly the problems the ACR setup above is designed to solve. IF you run multiple jobs per day it is very possible to start to run low on battery power on the last job, particularly for those who have their pump pressures turned up. On a large roof project, it is very possible to run the pump long enough to pull the battery charge down to the point where you start slowing the pump down on a 100 AH deep cycle. If you turn the pressure on a Fatboy up, then your draw jumps exponentially (and your pump output flow drops exponentially as well). It is easy to run out of juice after hours of continuous spray time on multi unit projects. I've done it. More than once.  

In addition...and the more likely of scenarios. Face it, anybody who runs electric either has or WILL forget to charge the battery overnight at one time or another. Having the ACR allows you to charge the deep cycle as you drive to the job site and then idle the engine to charge it as you spray without damage to the battery that overcharging from the alternator causes. The ACR allows you to charge the deep cycle battery safely. You should NOT hook up a Deep Cycle battery in series with a regular car/truck starting battery with engine alternator. It will degrade the deep cycle.  And yes, you can use a battery charger with it back at the shop. 

*Please note, there is an additional ground which needs to be run to the ACR not shown. Please follow the ACR install instructions.

6 GA wiring is the recommended wire size. All terminations should be heat shrinked and Plasti-Dipping is additionally recommended. Remember, you are dealing with a corrosive environment...treat all connections as you would for an offshore salt water marine environment. 

The battery you use MUST be a deep cycle. A standard car battery is not recommended. Electric pumps draw a lot of amperage and starting batteries are NOT designed for this. 100 AMP hour should be the minimum size. Gel is more stable and allows for a deeper draw but it is more expensive running around $200-$250. 

SAFETY WARNING: BATTERIES MUST BE KEPT AWAY FROM ALL SOURCES OF SH FUMES AND LIQUIDS. IT IS STRONGLY RECOMMENDED A BATTERY ENCLOSURE BE UTILIZED. BATTERY ACIDS REACT VIOLENTLY AND POTENTIALLY EXPLOSIVELY WHEN MIXED WITH SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE. A BATTERY UNDERGOING HEAVY DRAW WILL OUTPUT GAS AND POTENTIALLY ACID BUBBLES.  

Also remember, batteries are heavy and need to be properly secured lest they become lethal flying objects during an accident. 

A Master Cutoff switch is a safety necessity for all electric pump systems. Connections rust and break, and you WILL need to replace pumps, relays and pressure switches. This is also why it is STRONGLY recommended the pump wires be terminated and run into a Bus Bar. The Bus Bar allows for quick disconnection and replacement of pumps and relays in-field. Spare Pumps, relays and pressure switches should always be kept on the truck. These spares should be pre-terminated so they can be quickly disconnected and swapped in. It is recommended that all connections as well as the ACR be in a weatherized non conductive box to minimize corrosion. Corrosion adds resistance. Resistance adds heat. I've MELTED the cutoff switches and the wiring on PITB setups before running hours on end due to corrosion build up and the extra heat it generated. 

Edited by PeakOfPerfection

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Great info

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Posted (edited)

Found these stacked tanks that are 36 x 36 square so then they are a little shorter then the tote a lube tanks. These are called Rhino Tuff stackable tanks and I found them 25% off at this place but they don't seem to have the 45 gallon tank I wanted but still a good price for the 120 and the 80 gallon stacked only $411.00

the website for info is www.rhinotufftanks.com

for ordering found 25% off standardus.com

Haven't ordered yet but considering the price probably will but need to check things little more as I'm considering inside a van and venting to outside but want to keep height down so be nice to have the 45 g for straight SH tank then 120 for mixed.

What do you think Kevin compared to the Tote a lube tanks.

 

I did find the 45 g tank for $170.89 which is pretty good price too.

strickequipment.com

 

So with a 120 g tank and 45 g on top it would only be 37 inches tall.

 

RTT-1010.jpg

Edited by Twin Ports Roof Cleaning

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These have been brought to my attention before. There is only one issue I can see with these tanks and I'll contact the mfg to see if we can get around it....the tanks have threaded brass inserts in the outputs. That won't work. Brass is not SH resistant on a long term basis and will rot out. Good find though. 

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These have been brought to my attention before. There is only one issue I can see with these tanks and I'll contact the mfg to see if we can get around it....the tanks have threaded brass inserts in the outputs. That won't work. Brass is not SH resistant on a long term basis and will rot out. Good find though. 

That's for sure! 

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Posted (edited)

OK...well good thing I checked first then. Looks like the threads themselves are brass not just the plug. Might be hard to fix, thanks for pointing that out.

I did call them as they are in Minnesota about 3 hours from me. They have done away with the brass fitting and now use 304 stainless in the two lower plugs, stainless corrodes about as fast so scratch that one too.  Fluidall or Tote a Lube tanks are in Minnesota too,

I might just go down to the Tote A Lube warehouse and get them then I can get the 5 g tank too all in one place.

 

Edited by Twin Ports Roof Cleaning

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OK...well good thing I checked first then. Looks like the threads themselves are brass not just the plug. Might be hard to fix, thanks for pointing that out.

I did call them as they are in Minnesota about 3 hours from me. They have done away with the brass fitting and now use 304 stainless in the two lower plugs, stainless corrodes about as fast so scratch that one too.  Fluidall or Tote a Lube tanks are in Minnesota too,

I might just go down to the Tote A Lube warehouse and get them then I can get the 5 g tank too all in one place.

 

A PVC Replacement would be nice

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Finishing up the air piping and I decided to build a water trap system out of 1/2" black pipe. I'm in a enclosed trailer and the tanks I'm using are sealed so it would be hard to try and coil air hose inside the water tank.

Not sure how it will work but supposedly it works good, as the black pipe cools the air and the moisture drops down to the drip leg and can be bleed out with the attached valves.

After each drip leg, the water is reduced more and more and by the time you drain the last drip leg, no water should come out.

 

water-trap.jpg

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SingleTank_zpsvfcf6e9u.jpg

Single Tank setup. Draw tube with small rinse bucket or tank. 

This is the most rudimentary of all the setups. A tank, a bucket, a draw tube and a pump (and a reel if desired). Does not get any more basic than this. 

Applicable for any kind of pump. Note: This design should NOT be used in an enclosed trailer or box truck as the fumes and drips will eventually destroy the interior. This is best for a trailer and you should rinse the trailer/truck bed/flat bed after every job as there will inevitably be drips from the drop tube. Consider a sealed/vented tank system instead...even with an open truck or trailer. 

Note: the supply line must be a spiral reinforced suction line. This line is under vacuum as the pump draws and you do not want to collapse it. Spray hose line should NOT be used here...only on the output from the pump. 

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drawtube_zps87wdtyts.jpg

Basic Dip Tube Design. Please note:  I DO NOT RECOMMEND THE USE OF A DIP TUBE SYSTEM. Using a dip tube into an open tank is a recipe for rotting out your trailer/truck/etc. The drips and the fumes will corrode everything out. A bulkhead fitting is a few dollars and takes all of 5 minutes to install. 

PLEASE NOTE: THIS SHOWS THE CHECK VALVE AS A FLAPPER TYPE. YOU MAY ALSO USE A BALL CHECK VALVE. 

ALSO NOTE: You CAN put a 90 degree elbow at the bottom and turn the strainer sideways. This has an advantage in that you will get a bit more fluid from the tank. However be careful if you use a bucket to rinse that you do not make it wider than the bucket diameter. 

Q: Can I use it without the check valve?

A: Yes, but you will end up fighting priming constantly. The check valve prevents the fluid from back flowing out of the line, providing prime for the pump. 

Q: Can I use the check valve at the END of the pipe, just before the filter?

A: Absolutely! Matter of fact, that is an even better design...I just didn't feel like re-drawing it again. 

Q: What kind of filter should I use? 

A: It can be as simple as a piece of PVC pipe with slots cut in it and a cap at the end. The only thing you do NOT want is metal mesh. Pressure Tek sells one that is dirt cheap. It is poly. It will work fine. 

 

My setup I bought was already set up with a dip tube. I will eventually change that. For right now I just keep it closed until I need to put the dip tube in. What I want to know is, if I have the tops (manhole) on my tanks screwed on, do i need to vent them regardless? I did notice after a week of having my miter saw in the trailer that the aluminum base had started to corode. That just goes to show you how corosive this stuff is. You also have me worried about SH fumes and my battery, although it is in a battery box. I wonder if I have to worry about the electric start and the SH fumes? All this makes me wonder if I made the right choice in purchasing an enclosed trailer. Should I go to an open trailer or will venting it take care of it altogether? I just don't want to sink money in something to have it go to nothing. Please let me know what your opinion is on all of this please. Thanks, Harold

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My setup I bought was already set up with a dip tube. I will eventually change that. For right now I just keep it closed until I need to put the dip tube in. What I want to know is, if I have the tops (manhole) on my tanks screwed on, do i need to vent them regardless? I did notice after a week of having my miter saw in the trailer that the aluminum base had started to corode. That just goes to show you how corosive this stuff is. You also have me worried about SH fumes and my battery, although it is in a battery box. I wonder if I have to worry about the electric start and the SH fumes? All this makes me wonder if I made the right choice in purchasing an enclosed trailer. Should I go to an open trailer or will venting it take care of it altogether? I just don't want to sink money in something to have it go to nothing. Please let me know what your opinion is on all of this please. Thanks, Harold

You only need to vent your tanks if they are in an enclosed system. Otherwise it's vented when you open the lid. Keep your battery in the box preferably in a location it won't be constantly doused with roof mix and don't worry about it. It's perfectly fine. The fumes aren't a concern with it either. Keep spills in the trailer to a minimum and it will last a long time. Drips here and there are not going to cause big problems. Avoid letting your mix overflow when making or especially your full strength when pumping into your tank. Keep things out of the trailer like your saw that don't need to be in there. Will it last forever? No, but it will make you a bunch of money before it dies. 

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You only need to vent your tanks if they are in an enclosed system. Otherwise it's vented when you open the lid. Keep your battery in the box preferably in a location it won't be constantly doused with roof mix and don't worry about it. It's perfectly fine. The fumes aren't a concern with it either. Keep spills in the trailer to a minimum and it will last a long time. Drips here and there are not going to cause big problems. Avoid letting your mix overflow when making or especially your full strength when pumping into your tank. Keep things out of the trailer like your saw that don't need to be in there. Will it last forever? No, but it will make you a bunch of money before it dies. 

10 - 4 on that! I wish I had a picture of every cleaning rig I have built in 25 years of doing this. They all started off real pretty, until they started dying. I was so attached to one roof cleaning truck I made, that I actually paid the junkyard to place my old truck under the only shade tree in the entire junkyard, as it was cannibalized for parts. 

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My setup I bought was already set up with a dip tube. I will eventually change that. For right now I just keep it closed until I need to put the dip tube in. What I want to know is, if I have the tops (manhole) on my tanks screwed on, do i need to vent them regardless? I did notice after a week of having my miter saw in the trailer that the aluminum base had started to corode. That just goes to show you how corosive this stuff is. You also have me worried about SH fumes and my battery, although it is in a battery box. I wonder if I have to worry about the electric start and the SH fumes? All this makes me wonder if I made the right choice in purchasing an enclosed trailer. Should I go to an open trailer or will venting it take care of it altogether? I just don't want to sink money in something to have it go to nothing. Please let me know what your opinion is on all of this please. Thanks, Harold

Here is the basic premise. In any mobile cleaning system, the thing that is most likely to cause the vehicle to become unusable is corrosion. Corrosion will come from two sources: SH Fumes and water with fumes being overwhelmingly the most destructive to not only the vehicle, but the equipment as well. 

The point of a sealed tank system and external fills is to eliminate the fume problem by controlling where those fumes go. Sealing the lid vent on your tank and venting it OUTSIDE the vehicle, away from the expensive bits, is the cheapest way to stop the constant output of tank fumes into the vehicle which...as you can see...is far more destructive than people realize. By controlling where the fumes go, you eliminate the primary source of corrosion and thus significantly extend the life of the vehicle and the contained equipment  

Because the fumes are heavier than air, The design holds true for BOTH open and closed systems. So regardless of whether you have an enclosed trailer, box truck, open trailer or pickup/flatbed , the sealed external vented tank system is a must, and acknowledges the nature of the materials we use in our industry. 

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I am trying to order the supplies needed to build out a(vented) system in an enclosed trailer.  I was having a hard time finding where to purchase the valves, couldn't find the correct part numbers etc.  I purchased a pump from Kevin and when I spoke with him this morning, he recommended a couple of places where I might find what I needed (thanks for the help Kevin).  Below is a parts list of two & three way valves, check valves, bulkheads etc. along with the part numbers that I found at usplastics.com.  Even though you can't tell it from the descriptions below, all the valves are PVC and have FPM O-rings and PTFE seats.  I would appreciate a review of these materials and any suggestions are appreciated.  If everything looks good then maybe the list will be helpful to someone else in the future.

The only thing I couldn't find was a three way PVC vented valve (recommended by Kevin)...

 

usplastic.com.thumb.png.9c8779232818b6dc  

Thanks

Kyle

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Is it ok to get a 1" Tsunami dryer (to prepare for future upgrade) to use with a 20cfm compressor, or would it be better to stick with the 1/2"one?

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Unless you plan to go to a 180 CFM compressor, the 50 CFM rated 1/2" is fine. 

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