12 posts in this topic

Posted

I am a fairly intuitive person, and I imagine that I might catch some flack for this post for one reason or the other. However, with moderators of the forum, and certain personal ties, this post might not last. I know that. But, being a paid member of this great roof cleaning network, I come here seeking the help of my fellow roof cleaning Brothers. I am in search of information pertaining to the proper cleaning methodology and solutions of which allow effective cleaning, without damaging the wood lignin, tannins, and moisture content of cedar shake roof shingles.

For my peers that are so gracious, or "at liberty to discuss" this information, please reply, or PM me. I seek answers.

I have a basic knowledge of wood cleaning and restoration, as I owned and operated a very successful business for 5 years, to put myself through college. I restored wood of all types, but as I understand it…there's a much more effective and less labor-intense method to cleaning cedar shake roofing. I am curious as to how those methods compare. (For those of you that are curious as to why I got out of the business…my career took off. Now, this business supports my family and another business venture)

Cedar shake is an animal in and of itself, as is any wood. However, I know that it can be cleaned EFFECTIVELY…and I want answers :)

Help a Brother out! 

Thanks guys.

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Posted

Call Bruce Sullivan. He is the cedar expert and has perfected a system for cleaning cedar.

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Posted

Thanks Gary-

I have already contacted Bruce, however he was not able to discuss any specifics.

I don't question his expertise on the matter whatsoever, and he was a very nice guy. He seems to know exactly what he's doing. I am in search of information that I feel members of this forum have to offer. 

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Posted

Research the phrase "3 stepping", or "3 stepping wood".  The same CORRECT process used to strip/clean decks is used on cedar.  That's not to say that some don't use SH on cedar, in fact many do.  But the proper way, in my professional opinion, is to 3 step it.  The 4th step, if applicable, would be seal/stain if so desired.

Cedar looks amazing when properly done.  It's also a LOT of work, so charge accordingly.  The last one that we did took us 3 days and cost the client $6500.

I prefer asphalt shingles :-)

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Posted (edited)

Awesome Ted-

Thank you for taking time out to give advice!

I'll search the forums and the internet as a whole.

I like the easy roofs too ;-)

Edited by Shingle Shiners

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Posted

Sodium Percarbonate mixed at 8 OZ. per gallon and Sodium Hydroxide added at 2 oz. per gallon  and applied with dedicated pump and neutralize with oxalic mixed at 6 OZ per gallon. 

You could also DS Sodium Hydroxide I've done it many times on Cedar,..and is actually my preferred method due to speed. 

Cedar that is just grayed out is VERY easy to clean.  Cedar with heavy moss takes alot of rinsing, so having a good "On Board" rinsing pump is a necessity,...counting on the customers' water is a gamble at best. And if they're on a well,..that will need to be discussed beforehand.

YES, these need to be charged for appropriately. Nothing like doing an asphalt shingled roof.

The results though are very gratifying.

Jeff

 

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Posted

Jeff/Ted-

I certainly appreciate your opinions! More than anything, I think that I am most impressed with the fact that I scoured the internet and the other forums, and could not come to this very basic information…spelled out anyway. I found some basic info from the forestry service, which was good and similar, but not really spelled out. I'm not sure why that is, but I'm glad you guys came through.

I have cleaned a few cedar roofs in the past, but I definitely used many man-hours doing so and I wasn't confident that I was 'doing it right'. I used deck=brite (SP), followed by light pressure (500psi-1000psi), followed by oxalic or citric acids (which remained on the wood when we left the job). If anything was added to treat/seal/hydrate the wood, it was done after the wood was close to 100% dry to avoid splotchiness. Never sealed, but occasionally stained. 

It seems like the heavier infestations/build-ups of moss, mold, algae, lichen, and so on, just cannot be easily serviced…but that's ok…the homeowner just has to be prepared/able to pay the maintenance cost I suppose. And, if they put the roof on, there's probably a good chance they have the money to properly care for the roof.

Again, thanks guys, you came through! Let me know if there's anything I can do to help you.

Dave

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Posted

Dave, I've posted these pics several times - you may have seen them while researching.    We used a specialty cedar stain after properly 3 stepping this roof.  Note that the stain is still wet, AND some shingles were replaced.  Both of which are somewhat noticeable.  At either rate, the transformation was quite impressive.

cedar_1.jpg

cedar_3.jpg

JetBlueRacer likes this

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Posted

Yeah Ted! I have seen those pictures before, but still very impressive every time I look at that job. Great work!

Did you apply with an airless sprayer? I imagine it was quite tricky around the gutters?

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Posted

I think I read in the past where guys simply used a 12V pump to apply the sealer,...makes sense,..as I know many of the wood guys use 12V to apply stains and sealers to decks.

I've never sealed a cedar roof,..so I can't say first hand.

I think many guys still use Sodium Hypochlorite on cedar with heavy growth,..maybe not ideal,..but then is a roof covered with moss and lichen. Used appropriately I'm sure it would be fine in certain cases.  Case by case basis on methods I suppose.

Jeff

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Posted

I think you're right Jeff. Some of the cedar shake roofs are absolutely inundated with growth and probably need several light coats of SH to break the growth down closer to the wood surface, then apply a 'safe' solution.

Makes sense anyway ;-)

Dave

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Posted

Would it be safe to mix Oxi Clean with sodium hydroxide? I am out of sodium percarbonate.  

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